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Research Seminars

2016-2017

 

Poster
Meg Kanazawa
University of Exeter Historicising AIDS in India

 

1 Dec 2016

4:30 p.m.
10.66 Run Run Shaw Tower, Centennial Campus

 

 

In 1986, the year that the first case of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) was identified in India, the Central Government, in collaboration with the World Health Organisation (WHO), inaugurated a strategy for acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) prevention and control. This paper explores the changing priorities of the Indian AIDS programme, tracking the continuities and discontinuities with earlier disease control initiatives on the subcontinent. Even as India was establishing its AIDS programme, the WHO through its Global Programme on AIDS, was developing a global template for national prevention programmes. In 1992, the Indian AIDS programme received a significant scale-up with a grant of $84 million from the World Bank for the first phase of its National AIDS Control Programme (NACP). At the same time, governance of global AIDS shifted with the creation of the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) with multiple cosponsors including the World Bank in 1996, replacing the WHO's Global Programme on AIDS as the main coordinating body. Following this, the Indian NACP continued into its second phase from 1996 to 2006 with World Bank funding of $191 million and an expansion of its activities. To what extent and in what ways was India's national AIDS approach shaped by a global health agenda? How was a global template reconfigured in an Indian context? In addressing these questions, the talk seeks to shed light on the complex entanglement of regional, national, and global AIDS prevention and control approaches in India. It also considers how the NACP and critiques of it are embroiled in a politics of structural adjustment and neoliberalism with regards to the Indian health sector.

 

Co-organized with the Centre for the Humanities and Medicine, HKU.

 

All are welcome. No registration is required.